Mid-afternoon music party!

Taking some time off from my grading to listen to Röschmann sing Mahler! (On BBC3. It appears that like many Anglophone operations, the BBC is suspicious of umlauts – DR is, sadly, deprived of hers on their website.)

8 thoughts on “Mid-afternoon music party!

      1. One could attribute it to heavy metal and mac keyboards, but given that these days any German quotation in an English language novel is likely to be misprinted to the point of gibberish (Seriously, publishers, you don’t even know anybody who could proof these things for you? It isn’t like it’s Hittite.) it seems more like a passive-aggressive response.

        Though actually, now I think about it, it may just be that they haven’t figured out how to get coding for umlauts not to end in a textual trainwreck, and maybe they’re unwilling to risk the oe solution throwing off a search engine?

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        1. I think you’re probably right: the non-use of the oe thing may well be a search-engine issue: people (or at least English-speaking people) are far less likely to google “Roeschmann” than “Roschmann”. I’ve never figured out why special characters are such a hassle with html – some internet forms or widgets realize what you’re doing and give you the right letter, and others just say: wait, you want an ampersand and some additional letters and a semicolon in there? OK!

          I haven’t read an English-language novel that had German in it in a while – they really have trouble with the proofing? This is depressing.

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          1. Last two instances I ran across were Elizabeth Gaskell (small academic publisher) and Jeanette Winterson (Random House), but that’s a pretty good point spread and those aren’t at all the only ones.

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    1. Right! There is music connected to this umlaut business.

      I recorded the whole concert & am happy to share, but it’s also available to listen from the BBC for a week. I’m happy to post the bit that’s just the Mahler songs, though 🙂

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